Share

 

Up


wales.gif (12639 bytes)

  cliffpathC.jpg (51205 bytes)

maggitibra2.jpg (72317 bytes)Our names are Mic (short for Michelle) Rushen, and Maria Wright, and our "adopted daughter" Linnie Frith lives here too. We all love horses, though Mic and Linnie are the ones with more experience.

Maria became infected with the Icelandic horse virus when she met Mic in 2000 - until then she had never even touched a horse having grown up in the city of Leicester. Although she can ride rather well, she still really prefers to remain mostly on the ground, but likes being around the horses and acting as "groom" for the riders, as well as making lots of useful things around the farm and helping with the smaller animals. Maria works fulltime as a manager for Jewson, and she loves cats, playing the guitar, gardening and doing DIY. Her favourite horses are Tíbrá and Ólga.

Linnie rode ordinary horses and ponies for years, then met Icelandics when she was in her twenties. Her first Icelandic was given to her because she was really difficult to catch - Linnie still has Blika, greatly enjoys riding her, and needless to say she´s no longer difficult to catch (well, mostly!).

Having visited Solva for several years, Mic & Maria jokingly said "you might as well move in" .... so she did, horses and all! Linnie works for the army as a mess manager at the nearby Brawdy army base, but spends as much time with the horses as possible. Linnie is also in the process of setting up a Pet Sitting business ("Linnie Lodges") as she already looks after animals for numerous friends when they´re away, and figured she might as well get paid for it!

Mic has nearly 40 years of experience with horses and ponies, 25 of that with Icelandics. She has bred and imported many good horses, done a lot of competitions (she has been British Champion several times in various disciplines and ridden at 5 World Championships), judged both in the UK and abroad (she is an IHSGB Judge), spent several years on the committee of the IHSGB (she is currently the IHSGB website manager), given many Icelandic horse displays, taken part in Viking re-enactment with the horses, appeared on TV several times, written plenty of magazine articles about the breed and introduced numerous people to the joys of the Icelandic horse. Sadly she has M.E. so now has to take life a bit easier. When she's not looking after the farm, she still draws and paints horses a lot of the time - she is an accomplished artist, specializing (needless to say) in Icelandic horses. To see some of her work, click here.

25 years on, there are around 25 Icelandics belonging to Mic, Maria and Linnie on this small farm in West Wales along with another 20 or so liveries and retirees. Young Icelandic horses belonging to other people here grow up as part of a herd, where they can learn to be horses and be taught discipline by their herdmates. There are also Icelandic and Jacob sheep, goats,  ducks, turkeys, chickens and far too many cats, and the vegetable garden is almost a full-time occupation on its own.

Contact us

Home

 

Solva Sweet Itch Solutions Ltd